A Wedding at the Woburn Abbey

 

Indian weddings are full of colour and laughter and although fun they can get overwhelming and pretty full on. Our civil wedding however was far from that. My husband and I wanted the civil ceremony to be intimate and completely our choice. So we took it as an opportunity to be a little creative and take a trip to one of our favourite spots in Italy, the Tuscan countryside.

We’d visited Florence and the Chianti vineyards in the past and having fallen in love with the place we wanted to have our civil ceremony in Tuscany. If you’re both British, a legal ceremony is 100% possible (we did our research).

After meeting a few wedding planners and visiting some of the most breath-taking villas you could imagine, we decided to scrap that plan. There was more than one reason, part of it boiled down to the dates and coordinating with our guests. None the less it’s truly beautiful and peaceful if you’re looking for a small and intimate wedding.

So, we were back to square one. Where do we get married? We needed to find a central location between London and Leicester and one which could accommodate 120 guests. After much time spent google searching, we stumbled upon the Woburn Abbey. It was magic, and after our first viewing, we knew we wanted to say ‘I do’, at that venue.

I particularly loved the idea of having a summer wedding in a room inspired by Roman sculptures with a very unique greenhouse vibe. The glass doors looking out to the fresh lavenders, along with the white marble and high ceilings gave an illusion of vast spaces and open air. It was perfect for 100+ guests.

My favourite colour is yellow and it was perfect colour to compliment the lavenders and greenery which surrounded the gallery. It also gave the boys a chance to wear summer suits which was ideal for late August wedding.

The weather that day was perfect and our civil ceremony turned out to be a successful event which we will remember for the rest of our lives.

P.s if you’d like advice on weddings in Italy, do get in touch.